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  • Knowing how evolution has acted over thousands of years, humans contracting cordyceps seems to me as inevitable. Look at how humans received aids from apes, for example. Apes were eaten in Africa by humans when they were infected with SIV and the virus mutated to fit humans. The same can, if not will, happen with ophiocordyceps.

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    • Actually I was thinking that one day this cordyceps would attack the human race. I know the fungus only grew on dead bugs and ants but really,one day cordyceps may also had an evolution it selves by human or maybe cows and poultries,things that human ate and when it happened and someone don't know,what could I say? We're tho one wgo's going to be the last of us now.But I hope it'll never happen since we all gonna kill each other and would do everything even torturing just to get some canned foods and supplies,I don't want that happens.But I kinda considered that this cordytceps might be one day be a threat for the human race.I don't know,how about you?

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    • "Look at how humans received aids from apes, for example. Apes were eaten in Africa by humans when they were infected with SIV and the virus mutated to fit humans. The same can, if not will, happen with ophiocordyceps."

      ...You don't know that much about biology, do you?

      Firstly, viruses are completely different from fungi. Viruses aren't even considered "true lifeforms" due to lacking several key traits that even the simplest bacteria are known to have. Likewise, vViruses behave in completely different ways from fungi. You can't use the two of them as if they were equivalent examples.

      Secondly—and I'm kind of surprised I need to say this one—insects are COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from primates. Humans are a part of the "great ape" family (the family "Hominidae": gorilla, chimpanzee, human, and orangutan) and share a great deal of genetic similarity to them; in fact, chimpanzees (genus Pan) have about 94% genetic commonality with humans (genus Homo). So it's not so much of a leap for an infectious virus, a proto-lifeform, plaguing chimpanzees to adapt to humans. Meanwhile, 50% of the protein sequences in the DNA of the common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) have mammalian homologs—which doesn't mean they are necessarily the exact same, merely that they share a common ancestry. Entomopathogenic fungus of the Ophiocordycipitaceae family are specialized in altering insect brains, which are far far far far far far far less sophisticated than mammalian brains, to say the least of human brain complexity.

      Ophiocordycipitaceae and other brain-altering parasitic organisms have existed for millions of years. So I think it's safe to say that the "zombie fungus apocalypse" scenario that is depicted in "Last of Us" is extremely unlikely—hence the reason it is fiction. So you really have nothing to fear from brain-rotting fungi.

      What would be more likely to happen is a mutation of the rabies virus anyways, possibly intentional weaponization. But even then, we've practically eradicated rabies in the US and we've known how to effectively deal with the disease for over a hundred years, so it wouldn't be a civilzation-ending problem—just another crisis we would overcome with time and effort.


      Have faith in humanity's will to survive, friends. We've fought through worse before.

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    • 75.189.224.222 wrote:
      "Look at how humans received aids from apes, for example. Apes were eaten in Africa by humans when they were infected with SIV and the virus mutated to fit humans. The same can, if not will, happen with ophiocordyceps."

      ...You don't know that much about biology, do you?

      Firstly, viruses are completely different from fungi. Viruses aren't even considered "true lifeforms" due to lacking several key traits that even the simplest bacteria are known to have. Likewise, vViruses behave in completely different ways from fungi. You can't use the two of them as if they were equivalent examples.

      Secondly—and I'm kind of surprised I need to say this one—insects are COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from primates. Humans are a part of the "great ape" family (the family "Hominidae": gorilla, chimpanzee, human, and orangutan) and share a great deal of genetic similarity to them; in fact, chimpanzees (genus Pan) have about 94% genetic commonality with humans (genus Homo). So it's not so much of a leap for an infectious virus, a proto-lifeform, plaguing chimpanzees to adapt to humans. Meanwhile, 50% of the protein sequences in the DNA of the common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) have mammalian homologs—which doesn't mean they are necessarily the exact same, merely that they share a common ancestry. Entomopathogenic fungus of the Ophiocordycipitaceae family are specialized in altering insect brains, which are far far far far far far far less sophisticated than mammalian brains, to say the least of human brain complexity.

      Ophiocordycipitaceae and other brain-altering parasitic organisms have existed for millions of years. So I think it's safe to say that the "zombie fungus apocalypse" scenario that is depicted in "Last of Us" is extremely unlikely—hence the reason it is fiction. So you really have nothing to fear from brain-rotting fungi.

      What would be more likely to happen is a mutation of the rabies virus anyways, possibly intentional weaponization. But even then, we've practically eradicated rabies in the US and we've known how to effectively deal with the disease for over a hundred years, so it wouldn't be a civilzation-ending problem—just another crisis we would overcome with time and effort.


      Have faith in humanity's will to survive, friends. We've fought through worse before.

      I'm gonna go eat my neighbor, just to prove u wrong! >:(

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    • lol Hilarious

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    • Maybe it will be able to infect humans, but I don´t think it will be like in the Last of Us.

      Because in real life it will just make the ant walk up a grass straw and die. The closest would be that the infected would try to climb up buildings. So you don´t need to bother with buying a shit-ton of guns and ammo ;).

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    • 193.17.72.197 wrote:
      Maybe it will be able to infect humans, but I don´t think it will be like in the Last of Us.

      Because in real life it will just make the ant walk up a grass straw and die. The closest would be that the infected would try to climb up buildings. So you don´t need to bother with buying a shit-ton of guns and ammo ;).

      Ok. I know a little bit about the Cordyceps fungi. Firstly: The reason infected insects travel 'up' is so that the fruiting bodies, once they erupt, have the widest spore spread. More spread means more opportunity for infecting more hosts. Secondly: Insects, the animals most widely affected by Cordyceps fungi, don't have a 'brain' per se. They have something called Ganglia. Ganglia are primitive nerve centers that resemble a very rudimentary Medulla Oblongata, having little function other than telling an animal "do X when Y". Some species of insect will have multiple ganglia along their bodies, each specializing in controlling a different specific function. Essentially, Cordyceps fungi if ever they were able to affect homo sapiens would most likely only be able to affect baser instincts, things dealt with by our Medulla Oblongata. Thirdly: The Cordyceps fungi, like all other living things, have one goal. That goal is to survive long enough to make babies, making babies meaning whatever it takes for that thing to create more of itself. This does not mean the CBI as depicted in the game wants to destroy mankind. In The Last of Us, infected individuals were displayed as attracted to civilization, and more importantly, potential hosts. They attempted to bite uninfected individuals of the host species, ignoring virtually everything else. It was determined that the Cordyceps species depicted here was primarily transmitted through the fruiting bodies of long infected hosts and the foreign urge was to transmit more fungi to new hosts. All of these factors make sense based on basic natural instinct of all life, especially existing Cordyceps fungi, so overall, although HIGHLY unlikely that Cordyceps will ever be able to affect homo sapiens, and I mean EVER EVER EVER, due to the much more complicated brains we possess, and also based on the behaviors that this nearly impossible fungus would force its human hosts to do, I believe that The Last of Us displays a scarily accurate portrayal of how the infections would start, spread, and manifest on a grand scale. However, in the event of a Cordyceps fungi transferring to homo sapien hosts, it is likely that our highly advanced medical community would notice rather quickly, quarantining affected individuals, and have plenty of time to prevent a serious problem. 

      Now to really put a jump on you guys, look up Toxoplamosis Gondii and the link with human infection and schizophrenia (hearing voices in one's head), as well as 'crazy cat people'. If there is something that might be more likely to cause zombie things, it's Toxoplasmosis gondii or something like it.

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    • well cordyceps uses the host ablities so it would use our natural aggrasive behaviour to bite people. 

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    • The biggest obstacle to the cordyceps being able to infect us would be the species barrier present between insects and Homo sapiens, making it highly unlikely that we could be infected by Cordyceps. Theoretically it could be possible, most of our "epidemic" dieseases came from other species, but they where domestic birds and mammals not insects. The Cordyceps would have to follow the priciples of germ transmission between species as described in Jared Diamonds Guns, Germs and Steel.

      To be able to transmit to Humans we would have to be in regular contact with the fungus. Which is possible for a   given the in-game Cordyceps reportedly originated in south america, where a high proportion of Cordyceps species originate, alot of which still have to be discovered and identified. Another factor would be that the original cordyceps could have attacked an insect predominat in south american crops. Maybe it also manged to transmit to another mammal species and then to humans. Further maybe the local people could have consumed the primitive Cordyceps which possibly had mind altering properties.

      Should the Cordyceps then have began infecting us, it would then attempt to alter its biology to suit the new hosts by building on its ability to alter the brain of its host and as the previous commentor stated, it would use our aggresive behaviour enhanced by mindaltering neuro-chemicals and infection of brain matter to multiply the number of potential new hosts it can infect.

      Also as a previous commentor stated it is extremely unlikely that this would happen but as illustrated above it is theoretically possible. 

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    • 203.59.126.38 wrote:
      Further maybe the local people could have consumed the primitive Cordyceps which possibly had mind altering properties.

      I like this idea.

      Maybe there were indigenous tribes in South America who used a sub-species of Cordyceps for their mind altering properties in rituals. This sub-species already had evolved alongside these tribes to alter their brain, however, the immune system of them could eradicate them pretty quickly. And with the expansion of farmland in South America, these tribes came in contact with local farmers, who have not been in contact with the Cordyceps (yet). So my hypotheses is that only these tribesmen were semi-immune to this sub-species of Cordyceps, and that on contact with these farmers it spread throughout the world fairly quickly.

      But that is only if it did came from South America, which is never confirmed.

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    • I guess it's possible but it's not inevitable lol. There are no signs leading to this possibility. You know Valley Fever? It's caused by fungal spores that sit in our lungs and give us deadly symptoms. But in order for a fungal species to take over our brains? It would have to have defences strong enough to combat our immune system, travel to our brain, and completely rewire it. I wrote in a different post about this, but the cordyceps virus in the game and in any typical zombie movie, in order for an illness to travel like that, people would have to bite each other. What illness has the potential to cause the brain to want to bite and attack? The answer would be rabies. It causes domestic animals and wild animals (that are normally afraid of people) to charge at them and attack. This allows for the virus to spread. What a lot of people don't know is that rabies is both airborne and transferred through saliva. Outside of saliva, rabies survives for a very short time until it dries out. Also, UVA light kills it. So any exposure to sunlight will kill it. So rabies travels predominantly through bite. So anyway, for a virus like the one in TLOU to be possible in our existence, the rabies virus would have to mutate with the fungal virus, which is HIGHLY unlikely. A more simplified zombie virus would just be the rabies virus, which humans can get, but it would have to have a long duration period to spread it to a lot of people. People/animals who contract rabies don't live a long time once symptoms start showing up. They usually die within a week. In order for it to develop into an apocalypse type situation, the rabies virus would have to be a lot stronger than it is now, it would have to cause people to violently attack people to where they were uncontrolled, and it would have to have a long symptomatic period. Also the symptoms would have to suddenly show up. Rabies right now can lay dormant for a long time before symptoms appear.

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    • Btgr
      Btgr removed this reply because:
      Inappropriate comment.
      06:01, April 2, 2014
      This reply has been removed
    • Well, that's inappropriate on this forum. 

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    • no

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    • you're all speculating.. go get your degree in mycology then come back and say your piece, chatting balls as per

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    • Before you all run off to pre med, just google cordcyceps and you can even order some to ingest as a supplement Talk about contact, & how 'bout that pix of dude holding a grip in top right ad). Of course order the U.S.  grown stuff. I mean just because catterpiller fungus (1 of a dozen names, of 400 varities) is from China and they claim all the wonder cures it contains, dosen't mean anything. A cheaper way to go is to just lie on a towel after you see the chemtrails, and wait... get ya some virelent monsanto stuff that way..and saves electricity, and the high price of vid games!

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    • Even if the Cordyceps somehow evolved a fungus that affects humans, I don't think it would play out quite like it did in TLoU. When an insect is infected, it doesn't run around trying to eat others of its kind, it just goes somewhere suitable for the fungus to grow and dies off. Sure, it could easily wipe out much of humanity, and the concept of spores is probable, but zombies? Not so much.

      I'm no biology major though. Just my theory.

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    • 98.213.215.39 wrote:
      Knowing how evolution has acted over thousands of years, humans contracting cordyceps seems to me as inevitable. Look at how humans received aids from apes, for example. Apes were eaten in Africa by humans when they were infected with SIV and the virus mutated to fit humans. The same can, if not will, happen with ophiocordyceps.


      Humans HIV AIDS weren't transferred through apes. It was a mutation of a dorment virus...

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    • everyone knowz if anything could mutate right? for me thing like thiz could happen, but it NOT gonna happen in sucz a zhort time . If anyone ever see BBC, they said that only one species of cordyzeps per one speciez of insect. so the outbreak of cordyzeps are not gonna happen in a short time. BUT, they could happen. thec can mutate to be a human eater, but bevore someone iz caught infected, no one will


      -sinzerly, Da BLU-Medic

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    • I think cordyceps is mostly prominent in Asia.  One has to wonder, though....for you see, the source of the outbreak was said to come from crops imported from Central America & South America.  The crops were infected with the cordyceps, of course.  It's just a question of how it happened.  Maybe there doesn't have to be some explanation; it could be that "it just happened".

      For more information on cordyceps, check here (as if no one here already has).  To think, in 2005, Cordyceps would've sold for over $9,000 (USD).  Don't know how it is now, plus it also depends on

      It is critical to remember, which I often don't, that viruses, bacteria, and any other similar microorganisms are capable of evolution.  By evolving, they not only become more resilient, but in some cases they can have broader ranges of targets to infiltrate (infect, whatever).  Who knows how cordyceps can evolve....actually I don't want to think about that. lol

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    • 75.189.224.222 wrote:
      "Look at how humans received aids from apes, for example. Apes were eaten in Africa by humans when they were infected with SIV and the virus mutated to fit humans. The same can, if not will, happen with ophiocordyceps."

      ...You don't know that much about biology, do you?

      Firstly, viruses are completely different from fungi. Viruses aren't even considered "true lifeforms" due to lacking several key traits that even the simplest bacteria are known to have. Likewise, vViruses behave in completely different ways from fungi. You can't use the two of them as if they were equivalent examples.

      Secondly—and I'm kind of surprised I need to say this one—insects are COMPLETELY DIFFERENT from primates. Humans are a part of the "great ape" family (the family "Hominidae": gorilla, chimpanzee, human, and orangutan) and share a great deal of genetic similarity to them; in fact, chimpanzees (genus Pan) have about 94% genetic commonality with humans (genus Homo). So it's not so much of a leap for an infectious virus, a proto-lifeform, plaguing chimpanzees to adapt to humans. Meanwhile, 50% of the protein sequences in the DNA of the common fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) have mammalian homologs—which doesn't mean they are necessarily the exact same, merely that they share a common ancestry. Entomopathogenic fungus of the Ophiocordycipitaceae family are specialized in altering insect brains, which are far far far far far far far less sophisticated than mammalian brains, to say the least of human brain complexity.

      Ophiocordycipitaceae and other brain-altering parasitic organisms have existed for millions of years. So I think it's safe to say that the "zombie fungus apocalypse" scenario that is depicted in "Last of Us" is extremely unlikely—hence the reason it is fiction. So you really have nothing to fear from brain-rotting fungi.

      What would be more likely to happen is a mutation of the rabies virus anyways, possibly intentional weaponization. But even then, we've practically eradicated rabies in the US and we've known how to effectively deal with the disease for over a hundred years, so it wouldn't be a civilzation-ending problem—just another crisis we would overcome with time and effort.


      Have faith in humanity's will to survive, friends. We've fought through worse before.

      Um.. the Black Death wiped out something like 3/4 of the European population, and we still have no idea where it came from, what caused it, nor how it could be cured.  Never assume that some future bug could not wipe humanity out.


      In addition, as a mental exercise, saying that a fungus could mutate to infect another species isn't that far fetched.  Unlikely?  yes.  Unheard of, no.  Hence the panic of bird flu (which infects birds) mutating into a human variant.

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    • What is a group of people purposefully went out of their way to collect a crap ton of cordyceps and went through the process of weaponizing it? Could that be possible?

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    • People, people people, you are all forgetting of an important thing: Theres only 2 ways to it happen, which the 2 of them are mostly NEVER gonna happen:

      1. Mutation

      A lot, and i mean ALOT people are mentioning it here, but first, this fungi is on earth for Millions of years, and fungis do not mutate that fast, considering natural selection, it's more likely to they go to extinction than anything happens.

      2. Artificial Mutation

      This one is more probable than the first one, but it's very impossible as same. I don't think renomated biologists and scientist would genetically mutate this fungi, it would be more to biological terrorism, which doesn't even have basis and enough funds to do it so, and the terrorists are already losing, So i think it will NEVER, BUT EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, EVER, HAPPEN

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    • And don't forget about the Hyperparasite this fungi has

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    • does anyone want to do a tlou rp?

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    • Joseph.t.wilkinson wrote: does anyone want to do a tlou rp?

      A bit off topic for this board, best to make a role play one separate. :)

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    • A FANDOM user
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